Total Hip Replacement
When the hip joint is injured or develops arthritis, hip replacement surgery may be recommended. This video takes a closer look at hip arthritis and what to expect during hip replacement surgery.
Hip Fracture
A hip fracture is a break in the thigh bone (femur) of your hip joint. Most happen to people older than 60 years of age, and women get more hip fractures than men.
Sciatica, also called lumbar radiculopathy, is a pain that originates along your sciatic nerve, the largest nerve in the body. The pain extends from the back of your pelvis down the back of your thigh.
Evaluation Procedures
To help the orthopedist determine your treatment, you'll need a physical exam, a medical history profile, and a description of symptoms.
Treatment Plans
For most orthopedic disorders and injuries, more than one form of treatment may be appropriate.
Is It Time for a New Joint?
Millions of us struggle with pain and loss of motion because of joint damage caused by arthritis. If other treatments fail to offer relief, you may wonder about turning in your worn-out joints for new ones.
Orthopedic surgeons use arthroscopy to diagnose and treat joint problems. An arthroscope is a small, tube shaped instrument that is used to look inside a joint.
Joint Replacement Surgery
Joint replacement is a surgical procedure to remove and replace an arthritic or damaged joint with an artificial joint, called a prosthesis.
Hip Replacement Surgery
Hip replacement, also called total hip arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure to replace a worn out or damaged hip joint with a prosthesis (an artificial joint). This surgery may be an option after a hip fracture or for severe pain due to arthritis.

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